Skip to main content

About your Search

20110701
20110731
STATION
WMPT (PBS) 13
LANGUAGE
English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13
the afghanistan strategy and bring home all of the combat truce by the end of next year. also, a conversation with noted british historian and and the four men -- amanda foreman. she has a new book called "a war on fire." >> every community has martin luther king boulevard. that is the cornerstone we all know could is not just a street garble bought, but a place to gather with your community. make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. we are happy to join him to combat illiteracy. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> jeff merkely wrote an op-ed in the new york times on tuesday titled let's not linger in afghanistan. he joins us tonight on capitol hill. thank you for your time. >> is great to be with you. when you say that we are lingering in afghanistan, can you define the word "lingering" for me? >> that means that our mission has been completed. in this case, the mission was to take the taliban out of power in afghanistan, to destroy al qaeda training camps, and to find those responsible for 9
, "bbc world news america." >> the british prime minister in afghanistan announces the withdrawals of british troops. germany's contribution to the euro zone debt fund challenged in the country's highest court. police in an australian state have new powers for removing veils to identify suspects. welcome to bbc world news. also, as the horn of africa struggles with its worst drought in 60 years we hear from the head of the un emergency relief. newspaper executives expected to meet british police over allegations that the telephone of a murder teenage girl was hacked. britain has confirmed that it will withdraw more troops from afghanistan next year. the british prime minister david cameron defended the decision that troops will no longer be involved in a combat role by 2014. his country is committed to a longstanding relationship with afghanistan. >> we will withdraw troops this year and next year. we will be sending combat operations by the end of 2014. we will not have troops in the numbers that we have now. but we will have a long-term relationship. we will have a relationship t
of honor, today for heroism in afghanistan. during a fight in 2008, sergeant first class leroy petry was shot in both legs and lost his right hand when he tried to throw back an enemy grenade. his actions saved two other rangers. president obama presented the medal at a white house ceremony this afternoon. later, outside the white house, petry said all of the troops serving overseas are heroes. >> whenever you have a chance or opportunity to thank them, check them, give them a pat on the back for the job they've done because they've earned it. that's the british award any service member can get is just a simple thank you. >> sreenivasan: petry is the 149th recipient of the medal of honor, and he is only the second living service member to receive one for service in iraq or afghanistan. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: next tonight, an assassination in afghanistan takes the life of the president's half-brother. >> ahmed wali karzai had survived previous attempts on his life but today a family friend finally did what others could not. the provi
the british people deserve a deadline. we have been in helmand province since 2006, in afghanistan since early 2001. i believe the afghan government, the afghan people, the afghan army deserve to have a deadline so they can plan properly towards a transition. >> so, it is over to the afghan forces. in the village, the police seem willing to help themselves to food, just like the taliban. we did find the taliban ammunitions-in a melon patch -- ammunition stash in a melon patch. the soldiers have not gone away. they were sniping on a mission that we joined. there is still a big problem with corruption. the question now, will the afghans be able to do the job the british soldiers have been doing as they start to leave? >> for more on these challenges and calls for an even quicker drawdown of u.s. troops, i spoke earlier with a former adviser to the u.s. military in afghanistan. so, seth, have david cameron asking the taliban to stop fighting, put down their weapons, join the political process. what do you think the chances are that might happen? >> there are elements of the taliban and other insu
afghanistan today. four nato troops were killed in bombings in the east and south. and, eleven afghan policemenç died in separate attacks. amid the killings, general david petraeus-- commander of u.s. and nato troops in afghanistan-- handed over his duties. he is leaving to lead the central intelligence agency. his replacement is u.s. marine corps general john allen. >> it is my intention to maintain the momentum of this campaign, this great campaign on which we have embarked. i will continue to support in every way possible, the recruiting, the training, preparation and equipping and the fielding and the employment of the afghaf oational security forces.ç >> sreenivasan: allen's tenure began just a day after taliban insurgents claimed another high- profile assassination. a close aide to afghan president hamid karzai was killed sunday in a gunbattle at his home in kabul. it followed the murder of karzai's half-brother last week. for more on afghanistan we turn to pam constable, who covers south asia for the "washington post." pam, thanks for being with us. the series of high prof
department. >> to afghanistan now as the governor has narrowly escaped a bomb attack en route to the funeral of president karzai's half brother. he was on his way where thousands of mourners gathered. seen as one of the country's most powerful men, he was shot dead by a member of his own security staff on tuesday. our correspondent joins us from the afghan capital of kabul. perhaps you can tell us a bit more about this explosion. an apparent attempted attack on the he will man province governor. >> well, certainly, that's the way it's being seen here. the governor was on his way to the funeral of president karzai's brother. one of the cars hit an explosive. four policemen accompanying him were hurt, though he was not. also two bombs were discovered on another rout to the village where karzai's brother was buried today. it led to panic, because people attending the funeral could hear them in the distance and there was some sense maybe there was aattack taking place, but it once again shows after one of the most powerful men in afghanistan was killed, it's feared there could be more assassinat
that great contributions of this for the wars in afghanistan and iraq only 24% said increased domestic spending. and while there is a lot of focus on domestic spending, if you talk to the ode person, it's -- that spending is seen as -- if it involves waste, fraud and abuse. but when benefits or when the entitlements are considered, that's not considered waste, fraud and abuse. >> so when you -- when you asked him about the trade-off they're prepared to accept in terms of, you know, how much cutting are you as a citizen prepared to see, to deal with the debt what do you find? >> surprisingly, when you ask about what is more important, preserving benefits for social security and medicare, or reducing deficit or the debt, 2 to 1 people say preserve our benefits. there is very little give there. now republicans are of the -- more of the view that reducing the deficit should be given high priority. but even among republicans it's really interesting. there is a big income divide. affluent republicans say it is more important to reduce the deficit but poorer republicans, middle class and lowe
, and also those of the relatives of servicemen who had been killed in afghanistan and iraq. rebekah brooks has resigned as chief executive of news international. aaron is here. a business decision, this one? >> well, look, another shock -- well, in two weeks of shocks we've had coming out of this story. now, this is quite amazing, because yesterday's story was trying to get rebekah brooks and, of course, rupert murdoch's son in front of this hearing committee, where they are expected to be grilled very hard. now, rebekah brooks had said she welcomed to answer the questions, but some of the questions she said she may not be able to answer. now, he's the question, because this is just breaking, we're still basically reading across here and just trying to find out the implications. does this mean now that she has stepped down as the chief of news international, which, for our global viewers, the arm that -- the murdoch arm that runs all the newspapers, which includes the now-defunct "news of the world," which clomesed down last sunday. does she still have to appear and answer or not answer so
in afghanistan. according to his father, e-mail messages he received after his death had been read, he suspect by hackers. "they need to be called to account for what they have done and to suffer whatever punishment is appropriate. i am sure that will happen but it will take time. >> he is likely to be right. public inquiries and the scrutiny of what went on in this newspaper could continue for years. >> now off for news from around the world. humberto leal garcia -- president ali abdullah saleh has appeared on state television after his injuries. he stressed the need for dialogue to resolve yemen's problems. european central bank has raised its main interest rate by a quarter of a percent to try to keep a lid on inflation. the decision by the bank is controversial and the country is already struggling with government debt crisis. greece and portugal face higher borrowing costs. almost 60 years ago, doctors performed the world's first working transplant. scientists and london and sweden have gone a step further. they have managed to perform transplants surgery without using a donor. they were
died in afghanistan are upset the phones of the victims may have been hacked into. the detectives for news of the world were found to have information leading to this thought. >> they pride themselves on supporting british soldiers. now it's alleged to have been responsible for hacking into the phones of those families. the reaction has been one of anger. >> well, i suppose some of the families are upset that the phones were hacked. >> news international said it would be appalled and horrified if there were any truth in the allegations and said they are friends of the service men and the support for the military over the years has been true and will continue to be so. the editor told staff yesterday there was a great deal of anger directed at the newspaper and it's an -- that an extremely painful period lie ahead. now all eyes fall the head rupert merdock. critics say he should be here in the u.k. answering questions about the conduct of his journalists. matt, "bbc world news." >> let's speak to our political correspondent joining us now from westminster. >> this all started about
, afghanistan. this is all a distraction from a major geopolitical agenda. >> ifill: with all of those things on his plate, though, richard... david cameron. i'm getting everyone's names mixed up tonight. he lives to fight another day? >> yes, i think so. as you said earlier, there were a number of investigations. there's a criminal investigation we will be finding out... there will be a drip feed of e-mails, of reports, of parliamentary select committees and, you know, this will continue to be a bad news story for david cameron. how much worse it get december pends on the contents of some of those e-mails. >> ifill: i guess we have no choice but to watch. richard add dallas, heather conley, thank you both so much. >> brown: next, compelling insurers to cover contraception. the new health care reform law that president obama signed last year not only expands the number of people who get coverage. it also requires the secretary of health and human services to determine which preventive benefits should be provided by all insurers. yesterday, a panel from the independent institute of medicine re
sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: the mayor of kandahar was assassinated in southern afghanistan today. a suicide bomber hid explosives in his turban, before blowing himself up inside a heavily-fortified government compound. it's the third taliban attack on an afghan powerbroker in the south in more than two weeks. the new u.s. ambassador to afghanistan ryan crocker said it's proof the taliban is so damaged, it can't carry out large-scale operations. he spoke today in kabul. >> they've had to kind of regroup and figure out what they can do and, in some cases, that has been assassination. we saw a very similar pattern in iraq. clearly, these are horrific attacks but they can also be interpreted as a sign of significant organizational weakness. >> sreenivasan: a taliban spokesman told the associated press the kandahar mayor was targeted for ordering the destruction of homes city officials claimed were illegally constructed. two children were killed during that demolition. the prime minister of norway today announced an independent commission will review how last week's twin attacks were allowed to
bin laden, not to attack saudi arabia, because he was outside, he was in afghanistan, not to attack saudi arabia. in this country, if you and i re talking about the mafia, we'd call it protectionmoney. that is one area. the people who investigated 9/11, and earlier at the cia, concluded that the saudis had been paying protection money for a long time. the second area that i think is especially interesting, and that both the joint inqui for congress and the 9/11 commission people delved into is the evidence on the ground in california, where the first two terrorists, the ones already identified by the cia, arrived. they arrived and the evidence suggests that an imam, the religious man at the saudi consulate first okayed them as sort -- first gave them a sort of tour of the area in los angeles. after that, the two of them connected with another saudi, who was paid from official sources, but apparently not for doing any known work, who had been thought of for a long time as a saudi agent. they connected with him in a meeting that was odd. he says he heard arabic being spoken in a resta
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13